1930 Taylor E-2 “Cub #1”

The magical story of the Piper Cub began in 1930 with the Taylor E-2, which bears resemblance to the far more common J-3 Cub introduced several years later. The E-2 was one of the first mass produced parasol monoplanes (single wing on top). Production survived the early depression years due its easy nature and popularity among small flight schools. Nearly 350 were built between 1930 and 1935.

When Al Kelch acquired his E-2, it had the common Continental A-40 engine, which was the first mass-produced horizontally opposed 4-cylinder engine. However, with the help of C.G. Taylor himself, he rebuilt his E-2 as a replica of “Cub #1”, the prototype model equipped with the French AD-9 Salmson 9-cylinder radial, producing 40 hp. It is painted to look as it would have straight from the factory test flights and even has a map case from the actual Cub #1.

Engine: 40 hp. 9-cylinder Salmson AD-9Price New: $1,325
Empty Weight: 525 lbs.Cruise Speed: 65 mph
Max Gross Weight: 925 lbs.Max. Speed: 78 mph
Wing span: 35'3"Ceiling: 12,000

The prototype Cub with 9-cylinder Salmson AD-9 engine. C.G. Taylor at left, pilot Bud Havens on right. The Kelch Aviation Museum's E-2 Cub was rebuilt to replicate this aircraft.

The prototype Cub with 9-cylinder Salmson AD-9 engine. C.G. Taylor at left, pilot Bud Havens on right. The Kelch Aviation Museum’s E-2 Cub was rebuilt to replicate this aircraft.